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9 Facts About Puppies

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Everyone loves puppies, we know. It’s scientifically proven that they’re heart-meltingly cute. But there’s more to the little fur babies than just those adorable puppy eyes. In honor of National Puppy Day .Here are things everyone should know about these four-legged snuggle buddies.

THE WORD PUPPYHAS FRENCH ROOTS

Etymologists think the term puppy may come from poupeé,a French word meaning doll or toy. The word puppy doesn’t appear to have entered the English language until the late 16th century—before that, English speakers called baby dogs whelps. William Shakespeare’s King John, believed to be written in the 1590s, is one of the earliest known works to use the (super cute) term puppy-dog.

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PUPPIES EVOLVED TO BE BLIND AND DEAF AT BIRTH

Puppies are functionally blind and deaf at birth. On day one, their eyes are firmly shut and their ear canals closed. Why? In brief, it’s part of an evolutionary trade-off. Since pregnancy can hurt a carnivore’s ability to chase down food, dogs evolved to have short gestation periods. Brief pregnancies meant that canine mothers wouldn’t need to take prolonged breaks from hunting. However, because dog embryos spend such a short time in the womb (only two months or so), puppies aren’t born fully developed—and neither are their eyes or ears.

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PUPPIES HAVE BABY TEETH TOO

Like many newborn mammals, puppies are born completely toothless. At 2 to 4 weeks of age, a puppy’s 28 baby teeth will start to come in. Around 12 to 16 weeks old, those baby teeth fall out, and by the time pups are 6 months old, they should be sporting a set of 42 adult teeth.

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PUPPIES TAKE A LOT OF NAPS

Like children, puppies need a lot of sleep—up to 15 to 20 hours of it a day. The American Kennel Club strongly advises dog owners to resist the urge to disturb napping puppies, because sleep is critical for a young canine’s developing brain, muscles, and immune system. Puppy owners should also establish a designated sleeping space on their pup’s behalf so they can snooze undisturbed.

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CERTAIN BREEDS ARE USUALLY BORN BY C-SECTION

Purebred dogs can exhibit some extreme bodily proportions, which doesn’t always make for easy births. Breeds with atypically large heads are more likely to be born by C-sectionthan those with smaller skulls. A 2010 survey of 22,005 individual dog litters in the UK found that terriers, bulldogs, and French bulldogs had Caesarian births more than 80 percent of the time. The other breeds with the highest rates of C-sections were Scottish terriers, miniature bull terriers, Dandie Dinmont terriers, mastiffs, German wirehaired pointers, Clumber spaniels, and Pekingeses, according to the study.

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SOME BREEDS HAVE BIGGER LITTERS THAN OTHERS

As a general rule, smaller breeds tend to have smaller litters, while bigger dogs give birth to more puppies. The biggest litter on record was born to a Neapolitan mastiff that gave birth via Caesarian section to a batch of 24 puppies in Cambridgeshire, UK in 2004. In rare cases, very small dogs do give birth to relatively large litters, though. In 2011, a Chihuahua living in Carlisle, England gave birth to a whopping 10 puppies—twice as many as expected. Each weighed less than 2.5 ounces.

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SOME PUPPIES ARE BORN GREEN

Sometimes, a puppy in a light-colored litter can be born green. On two different occasions in 2017, in fact, British dogs made the news for giving birth to green-tinted puppies. In January, a 2-year-old chocolate lab in Lancashire, UK gave birth to a litter that included a mossy-green pup. Her owners named her FiFi, after Fiona, the green-skinned ogre from Shrek. Just a few months later, a golden retriever in the Scottish Highlands also gave birth to a puppy with a green coat, a male named Forest. How did the puppies end up looking like Marvin the Martian? In rare cases, the fur of a light-haired puppy can get stained by biliverdin, a green pigment found in dog placentas. It’s not permanent, though. The green hue gradually disappears over the course of a few weeks.

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PUPPIES DON’T FIND YOUR YAWNS CONTAGIOUS

Ever notice that when somebody yawns, other people may follow suit? Contagious yawning, thought to be a sign of empathy, affects humans, baboons, chimps, and yes, dogs. But as research published in Animal Cognition suggests, young canines aren’t susceptible to catching yawns from birth. In the 2012 study, Swedish researchers took a group of 35 dogs between 4 and 14 months old on closely monitored play dates, feigning yawns in front of each individual animal. Dogs that were less than 7 months old didn’t react, yet many of the older dogs would respond with a yawn of their own. This pattern mirrors what happens with humans—children don’t pick up the habit of contagious yawning until around age 4, when they start to develop social skills like empathy. These results suggest that dogs, too, may develop empathy over the course of their puppy hood.

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PUPPIES LIKE BABY TALK” MORE THAN THEIR PARENTS DO

Like humans, puppies seem to grow out of baby talk, recent research has found. As part of a 2017 study, 30 women were asked to look at assorted photographs of people and dogs and utter this pre-written line: “Hi! Hello cutie! Who’s a good boy? Come here! Good boy! Yes! Come here sweetie pie! What a good boy!” To the surprise of no one, the human test subjects spoke in a higher register while looking at dog pictures, especially puppy photos. Afterward, the researchers played the recordings for 10 adult pooches and 10 puppies. Almost all of the pups started barking and running toward the speaker when they heard the baby-talk recordings. In contrast, the grown dogs pretty much ignored the recordings altogether.

 

 

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